Differences & Similarities Between Foam Density, Weight & Firmness

3d render of different foam mattress layers

When it comes to foam, the buying process is simple. However, there can be potential confusion when it comes to a foam’s density, weight, and firmness. From a basic perspective, these three terms are understood. However, when applied to the foam industry, the meanings of these terms can be altered to better fit the needs of the industry. As such, there can be some questions and misunderstandings as to what these terms mean along with their relationship and differences. This article is intended to alleviate any questions and misunderstandings that you may have.

Foam Density

Foam density is the mass of a foam’s material within a cubic foot. The denser the foam, the more compact the foam material is. This, in turn, makes the foam heavier. A foam’s density is characterized by pounds and is determined by taking its mass and dividing it by its unit volume.

Polyurethane foam stacked on top of each other

Let’s use an example. In the foam industry, foam is measured in pounds per cubic foot. As such, we take a cubic foot of Memory foam and measure it out. It weighs 3 lbs. This 3 lbs. foam weight is then divided by its unit volume – in this case, 1 cubic foot. 3 divided by 1 equals 3. As such, the memory foams density is 3 lbs.

Another example. If the memory foam was 10 cubic feet and weighed 30 lbs., it would be divided by the unit volume, which is now 10 cubic feet, and the foam density would still be 3 lbs. This example also aids with confusion over foam density and foam weight. There is often interchangeability between foam density and foam weight that can lead to confusion. Per this example, the memory foams density or material weight is 3 lbs. and its overall weight is 30 lbs. That is why it can be important to distinguish between the density or material weight of foam and its overall weight.

Importance of Foam Density

Foam density is important because it is connected to the quality and durability of foam. For example, a Lux foam mattress with a foam density of 2.2 lbs. would not be as comfortable or long-lasting as a Latex foam mattress with a density of 5.6 lbs. This is because there is more compressed foam material in Latex foam than there is in Lux foam. As such, a Lux foam mattress will deteriorate more quickly, leading to sagging, indentations, and a general lessened state of comfort over time. That is not to say that Latex foam would be better used for all applications. While Latex foam would be better used as a foam mattress, Lux foam would find better usage in couch cushions, automobile seating, or in a multi-layered mattress.

Perhaps this comparison chart can give a better visual understanding of different foam types and their relationship to density:

Foam Type (Density)
Quality
Durability
Cost
Commercial Grade Polyurethane Foam (1.2 lbs.) Low Low Very Low
Industrial Grade High Density Foam (1.9 lbs.) Medium Medium Low
Lux Foam (2.2 lbs.) Good Good Medium
High Resilience Foam (3.0 lbs.) Very Good Very Good High
Memory Foam (5.0 lbs.) Excellent Excellent Very High
Latex Foam (5.6 lbs.) Excellent Excellent Very High

Foam Weight

Foam weight is the physical weight of the foam. So, if you purchase a 10 cubic foot piece of foam at a density of 5 lbs., the weight of that foam would be 50 lbs. (50 = 10 cubic feet X 5 lbs. density). The foam density remains 5 lbs. Keep in mind that foam mattresses can become quite heavy as you increase the thickness and size, especially when the foam is dense. Plan accordingly if it is.

Foam Firmness

Foam firmness is how much a foam compresses when pressure is applied to it. Firmness is a simplified way of saying Indent Load Deflection (ILD). All foam types have an ILD rating. To get an ILD rating, a 15” x 15” x 4” foam block has pressure applied to it by a circular disk measuring 4″ in diameter. The ILD rating is achieved when the circular disk compresses the foam by 25% of its thickness, in this case 1”. The amount of weight applied to reach this target percentage is the ILD number that the foam receives as its firmness.

For example, if 50 lbs. of pressure is required to compress a block of foam 25%, the foam is given an ILD 50, which is firm. More force is applied to firmer foam types and less force is applied to softer foam types. The higher the ILD number, the more force is applied, and thus the firmer the foam. Most foams have an ILD between 15 and 70. However, foam can go even higher, with Charcoal and Closed Cell foam that we sell here at Foamonline.com having an ILD 90 and Rebond foam having an ILD 150.

Closed Cell Foam

Closed Cell foam – it might look dense but is a 2 lbs. density.

Foam Density vs. Firmness

There is also confusion surrounding foam density and foam firmness. Many people think that a higher foam density means a firmer foam. This is not the case. A low-density foam can be firm and a foam that is high in density foam can be soft.

If you view our ILD Chart, you can see that the foam we offer come in many different foam firmness’s. Foam firmness’s range from very soft to extra firm. For example, we offer High Resilience foam in both a 2.8 and 3.0 lbs. density that is also available in most all firmness’s. As such, foam density has no correlation with foam firmness. Foam firmness has nothing to do with the quality or longevity of foam. It is simply used to determine how much a foam compresses when pressure is applied.

When purchasing a foam mattress, some of the characteristics chosen such as density and thickness is budget-oriented while firmness is mostly a personal preference. However, an important aspect that should influence one’s decision is the weight of the user/s. For mattress density and thickness, the heavier the person, the denser and thicker the mattress should be to support their weight. If the mattress is low density, it will lack support and lead to excessive sagging. If the mattress is too thin, it can bottom out and cause excessive pressure points. This is most notable when sleeping on your side.

The lighter the person, the less dense and thinner the mattress can be to support their weight. Lighter people do not need the same conformity from higher density foam to provide pressure relief that heavier people need. A thicker mattress could be purchased but is not a cost-effective purchase.

The chart below can give you a better understanding of what mattress thickness is appropriate for you:

Mattress Thickness, Firmness
Physical Weight (pounds)
Description
Low Profile Mattress, Medium Soft
2 to 5 inches
100 and under Used for cribs, folding beds, and mattress toppers.
Slim Mattress, Medium
6 to 8 inches
100 to 150 Ideal for people that have difficulty getting in to and out of bed, as well as children.
Standard Mattress, Medium Firm
8 to 10 inches
150 to 200 The typical mattress size found on the market. It usually consists of a couple of different foam layers for comfort.
Standard Mattress, Firm
10 to 12 inches
200 to 275 A 12-inch mattress will typically have shock-absorbing foam as the bottom layer and transitional layers of various other foam types.
Thick Mattress, Etra Firm
12 + inches
275 + Mattresses in this thickness have various layered foams and other materials. However, as height increases, convenience decreases.

With mattress firmness, the heavier the person is, the firmer their mattress should be. A firmer firmness will provide ample support to pressure points for side sleepers and general comfort. Conversely, if a mattress is double digits in thickness and is a soft firmness, a heavy user will sink into their mattress and will have difficulty getting out. A lighter person will want a softer firmness. We recommend medium to medium-soft. Lighter people exert less pressure, so a softer mattress will conform to their body shape better and provide more support to their pressure points.

Help

If you need more information about specific types of foam, visit our Foam Types page. If you have more questions or need more information, feel free to contact us.

113 replies
  1. Thomas
    Thomas says:

    Hi,
    We are looking for foam for an application we have in the neonatal intensive care units and delivery rooms of hospitals.  We are looking for a foam piece with the dimensions of 623mm x 467mm x 40.5mm.  
    ILD of 9lbs at 25% and density of ~3-5 lbs. 
    We are prototyping at low quantities to begin with to make sure the foam works then we will scale up making 22k of these beds. Please let me know if you have anything in this range please.  Thanks! 
    Thank you! 

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Thomas,

      The most commonly used foam for infants is a medium quality 1.9 lb High Density in medium-firm ILD 36. A lower quality 1.2 lb Polyurethane foam will not be sufficient because the foam will take to the shape of the infant’s body and will not provide the proper support. It will soften and indent in the center area while remaining firmer around the edges. You have referenced an excellent quality 3 lb High Resilience type foam in an ILD 40 that can also be used in this type of application. There is a third good foam type called Lux at 2.2 lbs in an ILD 36 that is also within the range of your requirements.

      Reply
  2. Stephen
    Stephen says:

    Hi. I’m looking to make seat cushions for the bucket seats in my car. They would need to be no more than a half inch thick so head room is not compromised. I would need a very high firmness foam so that it wouldn’t bottom out. What would be the firmness I should aim for to make the seats just a bit softer? Currently I make due with just sitting in the bare shell, so any cushioning is going to be an improvement. But I understand there are some foams that are extremely dense and wouldn’t make much of an improvement. I am about 240 pounds. Thank you.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      The issue is that thinner foam is less firm than thicker foam. Half-inch thick foam is very thin and will bottom out easily at 240 lbs. If you are going this route, then our recommendation would be to use half-inch thick Rebond foam at an ILD 150 (Extra Firm). That is the firmest foam we offer.

      Reply
  3. John Platos
    John Platos says:

    Hi I’m looking to make a reflex boxing bag that will need to withstand constant hard punches without deforming. I’d like to use a very firm foam core. Do you have any recommendations? Thank you.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi John. There are two foam types that will work. The first foam type is known as Rebond, and is very heavy at 5 lbs per cubic foot and very hard in an ILD 150. The second foam type is known as High Resilience, and is heavy at 3 lbs per cubic foot and hard in an ILD 70. The Rebond type foam comes in the firmness extra firm only and the High Resilience type foam comes in a variety of firmnesses, ranging from very soft to extra firm. Both of these foam types are of excellent quality.

      You can price quote or order either of these foam types by following this link: https://foamonline.com/cube/

      Reply
  4. Andrew N Dart
    Andrew N Dart says:

    I need to repad 12 wooden prayer kneelers (prie Dieus) in a Eucharistic Adoration Chapel. They get a lot of use. Which foam do you recommend I buy. I have no experience.
    Peace, Andy

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Andrew. The foam type used in wooden prayer kneelers for longevity and durability is High Resilience. Being used as a kneeler with a large amount of weight placed on the foam per square inch, we would recommend that the firmness be extra firm. We would recommend that the foam be wrapped in 3/4 inch thick Dacron to round the edges of the foam as the cover is pulled down tightly.

      Reply
        • FoamOnline
          FoamOnline says:

          Hi Dave. We would recommend a thickness of 2 inches in the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Extra Firm. The foam type Rebond would also work for kneelers and would be suitable in a 1-2 inch thickness. It is available in Extra Firm only and is of higher quality and firmness when compared to High Resilience foam. Samples are always available too.

          Reply
  5. Cynthia Larocque
    Cynthia Larocque says:

    I am completely re-doing a sectional, and I selected thick High Resilience Foam in a Medium Firm as a base since I have a much heavier partner who needs the extra support in the cushion. Unfortunately, my butt goes numb sitting on the Medium Firm since I am small. Since I haven’t made the cushion covers yet and the cushion height can be anything, I’d like to layer the cushions with a top layer of foam (also High Resilience) in either Very Soft or Medium Soft for a soft sit for me, and I was wondering if you could help me with a few questions: Which would you recommend, and in what thickness to go over top the Medium Firm foam for a much softer sit? Also, do I need to layer on both sides of the foam? Thank you in advance!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Cynthia. First, we would recommend Medium Soft for your cushion. Very Soft will likely sink down too quickly. Second, the foam should ideally be a 2″ Medium Soft top layer. If the cushion is reversible, you could have 1″ Medium Soft on both the top and the bottom of the cushion. Keep in mind that the average height of a sectional from the floor to the top of the cushion after it is reupholstered should be 18″.

      Reply
  6. Sandy C
    Sandy C says:

    Looking for recommendations for foam to make cushions-turned-mattress for our weekend campervan. Constrained to 3″ thickness that will cover the plywood sleeping base when pulled out. We are in the 150 to 170 weight range and at home are used to sleeping on memory foam. Would the high resilience medium firm be a good pick? Also, is a Dacron wrap recommended? Thanks for a great, easy-to-use website!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Sandy. Thank you for your kind words! Based on your description, we would agree that the foam type and firmness suggested – High Resilience in Medium-Firm, would make a great seat and mattress for your campervan. We would also recommend Dacron in a thickness of 3/4 inches to create a slight crown on the foam.

      Reply
  7. leah
    leah says:

    I am redoing cpr practice pad/chest made out of foam. The recommended (by AHA) push force for cpr is 100-125 pounds and indentation of 1.5-2 inches. so I would like a foam that indents 1.5-2inch when pressured with force of 100-125 pounds. What do you recommend as most suitable?
    Thank you in advance, looking forward to your answer!

    Reply
  8. Daniels BH NG
    Daniels BH NG says:

    Hi,
    I am looking to fill a Queen size bean bag. It is for my paitent who finds bean bag helps him to mould his contours to rest and sleep. This is for a body weight of 80 kg (180 lbs). I need to fill with shredded foam.

    Criteria that I look for:
    (A) a shredded foam that can hold the bean bag position on its own.
    (B) but yet soft enough that it moulds the body contours.
    (C) Not too hot as It is in the tropical climate.

    Of course I shall play around with the volume of the shredded foam.
    Please advise on the type of foam I should buy or even a mix of it (of which do advise the ratio). Appreciate.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Daniel. We have sold shredded foam for bean bags in the past. Our shredded foam consists of various foam types and firmnesses combined in a 33-gallon leaf bag, weighing approximately 5 pounds and containing approximately 4-5 cubic feet. You can find our shredded foam on our Supplies page, under Filling and Stuffing, or by following this link: https://foamonline.com/product/shredded-foam/

      We would recommend mixing this shredded foam with bean bag pellets in a ratio of 50/50 because shredded foam tends to stick to itself and will not shift to different positions as the beans will. Our bean bag pellets can also be found on our Supplies page, under Filling and Stuffing, or by following this link: https://foamonline.com/product/bean-bag-pellets/

      Reply
  9. Cynthia Larocque
    Cynthia Larocque says:

    Hello! I am looking to re-do my back sofa cushions, and my plan is to do a down envelope over foam. I was thinking of doing about 2″ of baffle box casing for the feathers on either side of a 2″ or 2.5″ piece of foam, using the High Resilience Foam. Do those ratios sound feasible or is there a different recommended ratio of feather width to foam width? What would be the best foam firmness to use for that? Thank you!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Cynthia. The 2-inch baffle would be slightly thin, which is okay if the cushion foam is between 2-3 inches in thickness. The foam type High Resilience is what we normally use with down envelopes because of its high quality, longevity, and comfort. Feather envelopes tend to be on the softer side, so a Medium firmness would be most common. Some people do not like the softer feel and want a more supportive foam. In this case, the firmness would increase to a Medium Firm for an individual up to 175 pounds, and a Firm thereafter.

      Reply
  10. Kris
    Kris says:

    I am redoing a window seat
    77 in long 14 in high
    3 in on the top and 9 in bottom

    I have 2 dogs that love to lay on it to look out the window and bark at everything that they see
    They weigh approx 25 pounds each.
    I have a cheep one I purchased through Amazon, it held up for about a year.
    Don’t know what kind of foam is in it but obviously not good.
    What do you recommend
    Thank

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Kris. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Density, which is a medium-quality, industrial-grade foam that is used in most average furniture and bedding. We would recommend that the top 3-inch piece be in a Medium firmness so that the dogs will be comfortable, and that the bottom base be in a Medium Firm firmness for support in case others would like to use it as well.

      Reply
  11. Julie LaBorde
    Julie LaBorde says:

    I’m looking to recover patio cushions. What’s the best foam for this and do I need to use a dacron for wrap. The sizes are 18x23x3, the longest cushion being 18x40x3. What is your recomendation?

    Thank you!!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Julie. The most ideal foam type for outdoor patio cushions would be Dry Fast. After Dry Fast, we would recommend, in order of quality, the foam types High Resilience, Lux, or High Density.

      At 3 inches in thickness, we would recommend a firmness of Medium Firm or Firm, depending on the average weight of the user.

      Outdoor patio cushions are sometimes wrapped in Dacron, it just depends on the desired look of the cushions. If you would like your cushions to have a puffy look, then Dacron would be used.

      Reply
  12. Niamh
    Niamh says:

    Hi, would really appreciate some of your great advice please. I am making a 8ft high fluted headboard using 4″ wide fluted pieces what foam should I use?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Niamh. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Density, which is of medium, industrial grade quality, in a firmness of Medium Firm. If you’d like the foam to last more towards the 15 year mark, you may want to upgrade the foam type to High Resilience, which is of excellent quality, in a firmness of Medium Firm.

      Reply
  13. Casey
    Casey says:

    I’d like to put a wedge foam under my golf simulator to protect the wall from golf ball impact. Which firmness, inches of thickness and foam would work?

    Reply
  14. Erica S
    Erica S says:

    I’m looking to have some rectangles cut from foam with similar firmness to McMaster P/N 8647K28. Their rating system says “25% compression at 4psi.” Am I correct that this would be an ILD of ~450? Do you have any foams which would match that firmness?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Erica. We believe that an ILD of 450 will not compress 25% with a load of 4psi. It sounds more like an ILD of around 150, which we do offer under the foam type Rebond. We would recommend purchasing a sample for testing purposes by emailing us at info@foamonline.com.

      Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Debbie. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Extra Firm for the seat cushions, and the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Medium Firm for the backrest.

      Reply
  15. Doris Moeller
    Doris Moeller says:

    The dinette cushions in my RV are way to soft, making us sit too low to eat at the table. What foam would you recommend, we would like the cushions to be very firm.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Doris. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Firm. If the average weight of the user is over 250 pounds, we would recommend a firmness of Extra Firm.

      Reply
  16. Teresa
    Teresa says:

    Hi, I need to replace the foam in the cushions of a love seat at a nursing home for nuns. The nuns say they sink when they sit on the cushions and then have a hard time getting up. The current cushions are about 6” thick with a Dacron wrap. What foam density do you recommend that would be firmer and hold up longer?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Teresa. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Medium Firm, which is ideal for an individual in the weight range of 140-195 lbs. Any weight past 195 lbs, we would suggest High Resilience in a Firm and any weight below 140 lbs, we would suggest a Medium.

      Reply
  17. Christine
    Christine says:

    ☀️Good morning, I have been researching for some time on foam to redo some very large antique living room furniture and honestly I have become overwhelmed!🤪 I want to say I appreciate the insight into foam your sight has given me as well as an advanced thank you for the hope and excitement in receiving a response in even twice as long as you’ve responded to all other comments. Hats off to your customer service!🎩👏🏻

    The largest person who would be sitting on said upholstery is my tower of a son who weighs 270. Everyone else ranges between 140-170 with the exceptions of myself 230 (5 years ago I had a fall and broke my back, I have MS, osteoarthritis and in the last year while in a parked position I was hit from behind by someone going 70mph & almost to the day 6 months later someone swerved into my lane hit me head on both of us going aprox. 35mph. So I’m a little bit achy now and again) and my special needs daughter 95lbs whom sits a lot as she cannot walk.

    I’ve said all of that because I need these new upholstery cushions to be very supportive but with plenty conformity to aid against pressure point pain. I would rather not over spend on what I don’t need but I would prefer to spend now versus be redoing these in a few years.

    I was thinking of layering foams (seat cushions are 6”) maybe an ILD 90-150, a high density med.Firm followed with a latex or memory foam ILD 15-33, 2” of each OR some split inches of med.Firm and latex/memory as cushion with a ILD 90-150 foam as a support under cushion.
    However it would be quite wonderful to be guided by expert advice even if that means my thoughts are completely off!

    Thank you greatly for your time and consideration! Have a most wonderful day.☀️🌹😊

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Christine. Thank you for your kind words about our customer service! We sincerely appreciate it.

      We’re sorry to hear about your back pain, but please rest assured we’re here to help!

      Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience, which is of excellent quality. For the bottom base, we would recommend a firmness of Extra Firm (ILD 70) in a thickness of 4 inches, and for the top base, we would recommend a firmness of Medium Firm (ILD 34) in a thickness of 2 inches.

      We’ve done this same combination for people in similar weight ranges and the results have been quite desirable. We disregarded the Latex and Memory foams because both foam types would be too soft to provide any support. Closed Cell foam (ILD 90) and Rebond foam (ILD 150) are both extremely hard and are not manufactured for seating purposes.

      Reply
  18. Anne
    Anne says:

    Hello! I’m so impressed with all your thorough answers!

    I am looking to replace a cushion of my sofa that my very infirm mother sits on. The cushion is quite wide (29.5”) and my mom is quite petite (-110 lbs). Because of her physical condition, she needs the support of the arm of the sofa, so she sits right next to the arm and only takes up half of the current cushion. Since it is a soft cushion, the half she sits on ends up compressing quite a bit and she is left sitting on a slanted / depressed cushion, which is uncomfortable and also makes it even harder for her to get up out of the seat. Can you suggest a type of foam and firmness for a replacement cushion that would still be comfortable to sit on for long periods of time (she is mostly immobile) but wouldn’t compress in that manner?

    Thank you very much!

    Kate

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Kate. Thank you for your kind words! Based on your description, we would recommend combining firmnesses with a top and bottom base in the foam type High Resilience. For the top, we would recommend a firmness of Medium Soft, and for the bottom base, we would recommend a firmness of Medium Firm. We would also recommend that the top be in a thickness of 2 inches. In this way, your mother will have a soft yet firm cushion for comfort and support.

      Reply
  19. Ellie
    Ellie says:

    I need to make a cushion for my driver side car seat, as I’m sitting too low. What would you recommend so I can be 3 inches higher after the cushion compresses? I’m 130 pounds, 5’2 height. Should I wrap it in Dacron batting?
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Ellie. Based on your description, we would recommend a wedge shape with a height of 3 or more inches, and the foam type High Resilience. You could utilize a firmness of Medium Firm or Firm, although Firm may feel a bit too hard for an individual of 130 lbs. Please note that wedges are sold in pairs only as they are produced from one solid block of foam. Dacron is not needed for this application.

      Reply
  20. Mike
    Mike says:

    Hi, I’ve set out to manufacture a collectable toy but the process of development has been halted by the uncertainty as to which type of foam “can” be used, and which foam/density would be best to use to produce a product of the highest potential quality.
    The toys dimensions would be approximately 6 inches in (length) x 3 inches in (width) x 2 1/2 inches in (height) with which I believe would be a medium level firmness.
    The idea is for the product to be soft at its touch, though dense enough to be squeezed without completely misshaping, and harmlessly lightweight while weighing enough to project a sense of high quality.
    And for the surface to be smooth and unblemished, allowing the five-star design, color and detail on its skin to fascinate.
    After reaching out to a few different companies who handle and specialize in various types of foams, I’ve been pointed in a multitude of directions which has been a bit confusing. Polyurethane foam was originally what I believed to be what I should be using but I was unsure as to which density exactly, but after speaking with the different sources I’ve been introduced to EVA foam as an option along with Zote foam.
    Please, if possible, can you inform me as to which will be best for such a project and how would I go about settling on the most suitable level of density…
    Thank You

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Mike. You were recommended Zote foam and EVA foam because you require foam that is smooth and unblemished. These two foam types contain these characteristics. However, they are also stiff, rigid, and lack return action/responsiveness to maintain their shape and size. We classify Zote foam as Polyethylene Foam and EVA foam as Cross-Linked Polyethylene (Closed Cell) foam.

      Polyurethane foam such as High Density foam at 1.90 Density, will be able to be squeezed and maintain its shape and size. However, the surface of Polyurethane foams are not smooth as they are porous to varying degrees. They are also available in many firmnesses whereas Zote and EVA foams are usually available in extra firm only.

      As such, it appears you want a combination of characteristics that not one foam type contains.

      We do carry these foams and you can order samples of them here.

      Reply
  21. Amber
    Amber says:

    Looking to order a wedge for prenatal women to lean back on while getting a massage. I know the dimensions needs just unsure of the firmness. It needs to be comfortable, solid enough to not need support from a wall but not too hard on the client to lean on. I was looking at high resilience foam, what are your suggestions?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Amber. You are correct in choosing excellent quality High Resilience foam for this application. With regards to firmness, if the person leaning on the wedge is having pressure applied to them, then Medium Firm would be the choice. If not much pressure is being applied during the massage, then a Medium would work well.

      Reply
  22. Olivia
    Olivia says:

    Hello,

    This may seem strange, but I am looking for foam pads to use therapeutically for my horse to stand on. They must provide a cushioning effect. This horse is over 1300 pounds, so I think I will need something with a high ILD value. Would the Rebond foam be firm enough to support the horse’s weight while having enough ‘give’ for this purpose? I am sure there will be some trial and error involved, so I am considering buying samples of various foam types. Do you have any recommendations?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Olivia. Rebond foam is the only foam that will work for your application. Its 5.0 density is excellent quality, meaning it will be able to withstand wear and tear. Additionally, at an ILD 150, it will support a lot of weight without flattening out but at 1,300 pounds will also provide support. You can order foam samples to test out, we offer them here.

      Reply
  23. Patrick
    Patrick says:

    Hello,

    First off, I want to thank you for all of the helpful insight that you have provided on this site. The information about foam is so confusing, but after countless hours of researching online, your site has provided the most help. I really appreciate this!

    I recently purchased a firm innerspring mattress (13 gauge coils), but it’s a bit too firm for me. I have been searching for a topper that will allow some give to relieve pressure points. I am 6’ 1”, 180 pounds and I’m a side sleeper.

    Prior to purchasing the new mattress, I was actually sleeping on the BoConcept Indivi couch that I’ve owned for years. I’ve always found the foam in the cushions to be the perfect balance of firmness, but soft enough to relieve pressure points. 

    The couch cushions are approximately 4 inches thick. And the BoConcept website, states that the cushions are made up of 35 kg/m3 CA HR foam. That roughly translates to a density of 2.2 lb/ft3. 

    Even though they’re referring to it as HR foam, based on the chart on your site, it seems like the density is closest to Lux Foam.

    If I’m trying to replicate the feel of those couch cushions should I go with a Lux Foam topper and, if so, how thick should the mattress topper be to provide a similar feel and support? Thanks so much for your help on this!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Patrick. Thank you for the kind words about our website! We sincerely appreciate it. Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience, simply because it’s of better quality than Lux foam. We would recommend a firmness of Medium Firm (ILD 34), which is slightly softer than Lux foam in a firmness of Medium Firm (ILD 36). You can always order samples to provide a more realistic feel. In terms of thickness, we would recommend 2-3 inches.

      Reply
  24. Somesh
    Somesh says:

    Hello, you have a great website. Very informative. I need some help to pick the right foam for a car seat cushion. I am 5’10”, 165 lbs. I need a 2” seat cushion that will give be good support without bottoming out. What type of foam or combination foams do you recommend? I can go up to 3” depth if needed. Appreciate your response.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Somesh. Thank you very much for your kind words about our website! Based on your description, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience split in 1.5 inch thicknesses. For the bottom 1.5 inches, we would recommend a firmness of Firm and for the top 1.5 inches, we would recommend a firmness of Medium Firm.

      Reply
  25. Carole Bélanger
    Carole Bélanger says:

    Hi, I am replacing all the cushions of my sailboat’s sofa (inside). The base of the sofa is made of wood and not straps. The thickness of the foam will be 6 inches for the seat and I think 5 inches for the back foam. What would be your foam recommendation for the seat and for the back. I’m looking for something high quality, very comfortable and durable where we can sit for hours. My husband’s weight is about 180 pounds and I’m 135 pounds. I was thinking of a medium-firm high resilience foam (35ILD) for the seat and soft foam (21ILD) for the back and I’ll add 1.25 inches of dacron on the cushions. However, I wonder if it would be preferable to use two different types of firmness for seat foam. It will be a huge project and I want to do it right at the beginning. Any advice would be appreciated. Thank you

    Carole Bélanger

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Carole. Based on your description, for the inside cushions, there are two seating options both utilizing the excellent quality foam type High Resilience. The first seating option would be to use a solid 6-inch piece in a firmness of Medium Firm. The second seating option would be to use a 4-inch thick Medium Firm bottom base with a 2-inch thick Medium top layer. In terms of the back cushions, we would recommend the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Soft.

      Regarding the back cushions for your outdoor set, there are also two options utilizing the foam type Dry Fast. The first back cushion option would be to use a solid 5-inch piece in a firmness of Medium. The second back cushion option would be to use a 3-inch Medium back base with a 2-inch Soft front face. In terms of the outside seat cushions, we would recommend the foam type Dry Fast in a firmness of Firm.

      Lastly, in terms of Dacron, we do not offer 1.25 inches thick – only 1.5 inches and 1 inch. We would recommend going with 1 inch thick.

      Reply
  26. Costuming
    Costuming says:

    I need to create some platform shoes for a musical. Probably up to 4″. I need your advice in picking a foam that is firm and will not compress too much under the weight (big guy, probably over 250lbs). I can’t just buy any, because his shoe size is a men’s 16. Do you have a suggestion on what type? Thanks!

    Reply
  27. Tri-Fold Mattress
    Tri-Fold Mattress says:

    Hello, many years ago I bought a folding mattress from a Japanese bed store but they went out of business. My old foam mattress is 4″ thick and I went with “Firm” instead of “Extra firm” and was very happy with the mattress. Is High Resilience foam “Firm” a good match for what I’m looking to replace?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi there. Most Japanese folding mattresses are produced in a firmness of Medium Firm, although they are also offered in a firmness of Firm and Extra Firm. We do have two foam types that would work: a medium-quality High Density and an excellent quality High Resilience. Both foam types are available in a firmness of Medium Firm to Extra Firm.

      Reply
  28. Cindy
    Cindy says:

    Hello! I also would like to thank you for having such a wonderful website and customer service to guide and inform customers!

    I need help to replace the cushioned on my window seat. The measurements are:
    32” length (depth) with 90” front length and 61.25 back width. The two sides are 35.25”. The thickness of foam needed is 3 inches.
    What type of foam would you recommend and type of firmness? Thank you!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Cindy. Thank you very much for your kind words, we really appreciate such feedback! Based on your description, we would recommend a 3 inch thick High Density type foam in a firmness of Medium Firm or Firm. If the foam will be used often, we would recommend upgrading to High Resilience foam in a firmness of Medium Firm or Firm.

      Reply
  29. Murphy
    Murphy says:

    I am curious to know if there is a foam that performs consistently under extreme cold conditions (-80F)? I am looking for something that is pliable enough to be partially compressed and then return to it’s resting shape without leaving an indent. Ideally the foam would be 35x35x35 mm. Thanks!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Murphy. Closed Cell foam would perform well under extreme cold conditions, such as -80 degrees Fahrenheit, but it will most likely leave an indent. There is less of a chance for indent if the Closed Cell is purchased on a roll by the yard, as this Closed Cell contains an outer coating.

      Reply
  30. Gerard
    Gerard says:

    Hi,

    I am looking to make a frameless couch that will sit on the ground and can sometimes be used as a bed or for fort building wiht my daughter. I am having a hard time figuring out what density and ILDs I should be looking for? Would an ILD of 70 be too high? We like stiffer mattresses but don’t want to overdo it.

    If we went with a lower ILD, but higher density would that make it better for sleeping?

    I am 210lbs and my wife is 105lbs.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Gerard. An ILD of 70 would translate to the foam type High Resilience in a firmness of Extra Firm. A more cost-effective alternative, and a lighter-weight foam type, would be High Density. In terms of firmness, because there is such a wide range of weights utilizing the foam pieces, it’s a bit hard to provide a recommendation. Because you and your wife prefer a stiffer feel, the most common firmness for your wife would be Medium for sleeping and Medium Firm for sitting. For yourself, the most common firmness would be Firm for sleeping and Extra Firm for sitting. Normally, back cushions are softer than seat cushions for the reason they receive less pressure per square inch when compared to seat cushions. In situations where the back cushions convert into part of a mattress combined with the seating, some users keep the firmness the same as the seat cushions.

      Reply
  31. Jim
    Jim says:

    Hello,
    Thank you for your very informative website.
    My wife & I want to get new foam for couch cushions that have become very soft. It has become difficult to get up from the sofa after sinking in, and our backs & hips hurt after sitting for extended periods. The two cushions are each 40” wide x 23” deep and 4” thick. I’m thinking that High Resilience foam that is firm would work best for us. We’re in the 145 to 165 pound weight range. What would you recommend?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Jim. Thank you for the kind words about our website! The most common foam type and firmness combination in the described weight range is High Resilience foam in a firmness of Medium Firm. Firm may be too hard.

      Reply
  32. Jean
    Jean says:

    Hi, I am looking for a mattress, I have a single bed with a very firm foam matress but I don’t know the name of it, I would like a similair matress for the other single bed.
    I am 70kgs and would love some info on the best type of foam as I say I like the firmness of what I have.
    It seems to be a solid block of foam with a nylon cover on. .Many thanks and very intersting reading the comments.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Jean. It’s a bit difficult for us to decipher what foam type and firmness you currently have. The most common foam types for bedding are High Density, which is of medium quality, Lux, which is of good quality, and High Resilience, which is of excellent quality. In your weight range, the most common firmness is Medium to Medium Firm. However, you are more than welcome to increase the firmness to Firm if you prefer a firmer feel.

      Reply
  33. Chris
    Chris says:

    Wouldn’t know if it’s possible but looking to make or purchase a block of the more dence ,closed cell , that is resistant to deterioration from sun and weather – foam . About half the size of a football field and 20 foot high . For about 10 different “secret ” projects. That After patenting everyone will want to buy . I’ve seen huge blocks like 10′ x 10′ x 15′ and would like to start with one of them . What is the biggest solid block I can purchase ?

    Reply
  34. NJ
    NJ says:

    I recently purchased an 8 inch mattress that has memory foam on top side and firm foam on another side. I weigh 188 pounds and my partner weighs 150 pounds.
    Memory foam felt very soft and gave me back issues. I flipped the mattress to firm side up and its better. However i still feel little discomfort at my lower back when sleeping straight on my back as firm side also sinks/compresses a bit. I slept on cotton stuffed mattress all my life and liked its firmness and comfort. Recently moved to these foam based mattress just 2 months ago. I am essentially looking for a mattress that doesn’t compress/sink just like a tightly stuffed cotton mattress BUT it also shouldn’t feel like we’re sleeping on floor. Something thats firm but not hard, soft but not compressing/sinking. Can you help? I could get a mattress made as well if you could help identify what foams should be used

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi NJ. The most common firmness for a mattress in the described weight range is Medium Firm. Compared to a firmness of Firm, Medium Firm would be more forgiving. The most common foam types for mattresses include High Density (medium quality), Lux (good quality), and High Resilience (excellent quality).

      Reply
  35. JL
    JL says:

    I’m wanting to replace seat cushions in two push back recliners. I have age related degenerative spine issues, and a sciatic nerve injury which makes sitting for long periods very painful. I think firmness and support are likely the most important factors in choosing which type foam I need.The cushions measure 21″ x 24.5″ x 4″. I’m unsure as to which type and firmness foam would best suit for this application, and should I choose a single firmness foam or combine two different firmness types? Also should they be wrapped in Dacron?
    Thank you for your information.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi JL. We would be more than happy to assist you! We just have a couple of questions. What is your weight range? Does the climate in which you reside stay hot for much of the year (such as in Arizona, Texas, etc.)?

      Reply
  36. Kyle Kirian
    Kyle Kirian says:

    I’m a senior in the East Carolina University Engineering Department, and my group’s senior project is to design a case to transport a 500lb weather instrument. My personal job in the group is to choose the right foam material to dampen vibration during travel and to design the foam’s shape. Through my research, I have found that crosslinked polyethylene seems to be the best choice, but I have had no luck on trying to determine what values of density and IFD would dampen vibration the best. The instrument to be protected is shaped like a cube, about 3 feet by 3 feet by 5 feet tall. The foam will act almost as a “hat”, covering the top of the instrument and will not be load bearing. Any help would be much appreciated!

    Reply
  37. Jon Mark Pleasant
    Jon Mark Pleasant says:

    I am building a flat workout weight bench (12″ wide x 54″ long). Standard workout bench padding is 2″ thick. Maximum weight on this bench would be 300 lbs. which includes the weight of the user.
    What type of foam would you recommend for this application?
    Thank you!

    Reply
  38. Karen Allen
    Karen Allen says:

    Hello,
    Your customer service department is excellent at answering all these questions. So here is mine.
    We own a rental unit, and we have a sofa bed that we need to replace the cushions on. The current cushions are 5 inches thick and have a batting around them to round out the front of the cushions.
    The problem is because it is a sofa bed, there is not a solid support for the cushions. The current cushions have compressed alot and kinda of sink back into where the back of the couch meets the seat.
    Because of it being a rental, we are unsure of how firm we should choose the foam. We don’t know sizes or weights of our weekly tenets.
    We were thinking of a medium firm with maybe a wedge shaped piece of foam between the cushions and the frame to help it from sinking back.
    Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
    Karen

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Karen. Thank you for the kind words! It seems as though the platform that holds the cushions up has sunk and as a result, the cushions are sliding underneath the back of the sofa. We have helped with such a situations many times in the past! We would recommend adding a 1 inch thick piece of Extra Firm High Density foam between the platform and the cushions themsevles. This should provide additional support. Please let us know if you have any other questions!

      Reply
  39. Chuck
    Chuck says:

    I am 6′ 2″ and 155lbs. I am a side sleeper and have bursitis in my bony hips. Excessive pressure causes a burning pain and interrupts my sleep. Memory foam mattresses or Sleep Number has not worked. I can only sleep comfortably on my couch by placing my hip in the crack between the cushions. The foam in the cushions is close to your High Resilience Med-firm sample. Two ideas I have. (1) A topper for the Sleep Number. (2) A twin-XL piece of foam that I can sculpture a hole or a crack to relieve the pressure on my hip. What is your recommendation of foam type and thickness for each scenario?

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Chuck. Based on your description, it may be most suitable to utilize a mattress where you can sculpt a hole or crack, as that seems to work best for you. A solid piece may not work as well. 2-3 inches in thickness should provide enough material to sculpt a hole or crack. As an excellent quality foam, High Resilience would provide great comfort and longevity.

      Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Amit. By a density of 32, we assume you are referring to the ILD, also known as the firmness. Medium Firm High Resilience foam at an ILD of 34 is the closest ILD we carry to 32. Regarding your question, would you please clarify?

      Reply
  40. Carlene Crowell
    Carlene Crowell says:

    Hi there, can you please recommend a high resilience foam for the following?
    – Commerical sofa, high traffic university use application, person weight varies approx to 250 lbs
    – Product: High Resilience Foam
    – Customer doesn’t want the sit too hard and wants some give.

    Thank you!!!

    Reply
  41. JonJackson
    JonJackson says:

    Hello,
    I’m a 350 pound man who sits a lot and needs a piece of foam to sit on. I will use it on the sofa for now.
    It does not need to be the entire length of the sofa.
    I would like to get a piece long enough to have extra for a seat later.
    So.. maybe 30x(whatever thickness)x72?
    I plan on cutting it myself, is that a difficult task?
    Also I find I’m really reactive to latex and smells of the sort.
    Reading about all the foam online has me really confused.
    Thank you for a foam recommendation in advance.
    Jon

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Jon. The average thickness of a seat cushion is 5 inches. In the weight range of 350 lbs, High Resilience foam would be the most appropriate. In terms of firmness, Extra Firm at an ILD of 70 or Super Firm at an ILD of 100 would be common. Extra Firm would feel softer, while Super Firm would provide more support. Samples are also available to provide a better sense of feel! They can be found here: https://foamonline.com/product/foam-samples/

      Reply
  42. Jay
    Jay says:

    Hello,

    I’m looking to build custom crash pad for my 50 feet rock climbing setup. I was thinking about getting a combination of foams one for better support (more firm), perhaps 1 to 2 inches in thickness and another for more cushion (less firm), perhaps 2 inches in thickness. The total height of all foams when combined will be 4 inches tall and each section would be 96″ x 48″. However, I’m a little lost on which foams to use from here. Could you please help advise as to which products would best fit my needs?

    Thanks in advance!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Jay. The two foam types that are most commonly used for your application are High Density (medium quality at 1.8 lbs) and High Resilience (excellent quality at 2.5 – 3.0 lbs). Out of the two, High Density foam is most commonly utilized in a firmness of Extra Firm due to its more economical price point. However, for those seeking a higher quality crash pad, High Resilience foam in a firmness of Extra Firm is typically used. Because of its excellent quality, High Resilience foam will better withstand the high pounds per square inch inflicted when users walk and fall on the foam. Crash pads are typically utilized in a solid firmness, although you are welcome to layer as long as the support base is firm enough to support a high number of pounds per square inch.

      Reply
  43. Gina Keysor
    Gina Keysor says:

    Hi I am wanting to replace the seat cushions on my 2 Flexsteel sofas. The frame is excellent but after 4 years the seats have become more compressed, and the fabric looks a bit loose. I believe they are 1.8 low density. I am leaning towards high resilient foam with medium firm feel. I don’t want to sit on a rock-hard couch but on the other hand need something that won’t compress on a couple years. Am I on the right track? The seat cushions are around 51/2 high and I want to wrap them in 1/2 inch Dacron. Will this work? Thank you for your help and your excellent informative site.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Gina. Yes, you’re on the right track! High Resilience foam is commonly used to upgrade the cushions of Flexsteel furniture. Medium Firm is also a common firmness. Most industrial-grade furniture utilizing 1.8 lbs High Density foam is manufactured in a Medium Firm.

      1/2 inch Dacron will work just fine. The thicker the Dacron, the puffier your cushions will appear. The thinner the Dacron, the less puffy your cushions will appear.

      Please let us know if you have any follow-up questions!

      Reply
  44. Rick
    Rick says:

    Hi. I have a mini van I’m converting for light camping and traveling. It has a fold out bench/bed combo made of a plywood base. The bench portion is 18.75″ wide from the backrest to front edge and the fold out portion is 14.75″ wide, for a total bed width of 33.5″, with zero room for any overhang. I want to use the High Resilience – super firm foam for this application. Should I be adding the extra .75″ to each of these pads like you mention on your website, or does the super firm characteristics of the foam make this unnecessary? Thanks. (Great info, BTW, on your website).

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Rick. Thank you very much for the kind words about our website! If the foam is not going to be placed within a cushion cover, you don’t need to add the additional 0.75 inches for compression. If the foam is going in a cushion cover, it may be more suitable to add an additional 0.50 inches as opposed to 0.75 inches because of how firm the foam is.

      We might mention that Super Firm High Resilience foam is very, very firm for a mattress. How thick will the foam be and how much do the users weigh?

      Reply
  45. Mary
    Mary says:

    Hi-
    I’m so glad I found this site. I’m looking to redo some used wicker furniture that I just purchased for our sun room ( rocker, love seat, and chair). We have an outdoor hot tub and I want people not to worry if they are wet when they sit down. From what I have learned, an air fast foam with some Dacron would be best. However, I’m not sure about the thickness of the Dacron or the foam. I would like it to be very durable and long lasting. The weight of the people sitting on these cushions would be up to 250 lbs, with the majority of them weighing between 150-220 lbs. Also what recommendations can you give me for the back portion of this furniture. Thank you in advance for any help you can give me.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Mary. We’re glad you found us, too! Based on your description, the foam type Dry Fast would be most suitable as it drains water. A firmness of Firm would be most common in the described weight range at a thickness of 4-5 inches. 0.50-inch thick Dacron should suffice! In terms of the back cushions, Dry Fast in a firmness of Medium Soft would be most common also in 4-5 inches thick with 0.50 inch thick Dacron.

      More specifically, in terms of the seat cushion thicknesses, the most common height is 18 inches from the floor to the top of the new foam pads. As an example, if the base of the chair is 15 inches high from the floor to the top of the base (not including the cushions), the foam would be 3 inches thick to finish at 18 inches in height.

      Please let us know if you have any other questions we can help with!

      Reply
  46. Randy Kalscheur
    Randy Kalscheur says:

    Hi,

    I’m going to be performing a cushion replacement on a higher end couch and doing a 1″, 4″, 1″ laminated with some Dacron wrap. For the center slab, I’m wondering if there is much difference between a 45 and a 50 IDL. I know this is a subjective thing, but also wondering if a feedback of “Oh, a 50 is too firm” would be possible. Usage is a daily use couch, for around 1 hour each day. Sit and eat on it – have been for 19 years. Will be getting a high-end density, as this is a great set of furniture.

    Thanks

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Randy. Great question! No, there is not a huge difference between an ILD of 45 and 50. An ILD of 45 would be considered Firm in the foam type Lux, which is of good quality. An ILD of 50 would be considered Firm in the foam type High Resilience, which is of excellent quality. The highest quality foam that we offer is Qualux, which is considered premium quality. It carries an ILD of 51 in a firmness of Firm. In the past, we have laminated a 1-inch thick Medium Firm to a 4-inch thick Firm in both the top and bottom. We’ve gotten positive feedback based on the comfort it provides!

      Reply
  47. Debbie
    Debbie says:

    What type of foam do you recommend for a bench that we sit on to put our shoes on and off. Currently it has a 1″ thickness. I was thinking of 1″ thick medium firm Lux foam based on what I’ve been reading. I want to use the same cover.

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Debbie. Based on your description, a common combination would be High Resilience foam in a firmness of Firm. You could also utilize Lux foam in a firmness of Firm. High Resilience foam is of excellent quality while Lux foam is of good quality. We hope this helps! Please let us know if you have any other questions.

      Reply
  48. Silver Jade
    Silver Jade says:

    Do you have a foam that will not compress at all,
    but that still can be cut and shaped into different shapes?

    Thank you.

    Reply
  49. Casey
    Casey says:

    Hi there!
    Thank you so much for having this Q&A available! I currently have a 1.5 inch inflating air pad for camping but it isn’t very soft to sleep on by itself. I’m looking to create a topper that makes sleeping on the ground in a tent more comfortable. I previously purchased a 3″ 35ILD 1.8lb foam pad and it was way too firm for me. Would a pad of the same ILD but less thickness feel softer? I’m 125 lbs. Or would you recommend a 28 ILD for this purpose. I’m trying to determine if the thickness or ILD will make the difference for me. Thank you!

    Reply
    • FoamOnline
      FoamOnline says:

      Hi Casey. Any change in thickness would be slight, so it wouldn’t make much of a difference in the feel. Based on your weight range, an ILD of 28 would be more suitable, which is considered a firmness of Medium.

      Reply
  50. Tom
    Tom says:

    Hi! Thanks for having this forum, and the quality responses!

    I have a pop-up camper that’s 30+ years old with the original mattress. Looking to replace the mattress. Some notes:
    -The mattress is a weird size, 48″W, 72″L
    -Can only have the mattress be 3.5 inches thick so the trailer will close
    -We both weigh between 160 and 180 lbs and share the mattress

    I’m leaning towards the High Density Foam in Medium or Medium Firm, but was wondering if that would be a good choice?

    Also, would a Dacron Wrap be possible in this custom size? Thanks!

    Reply

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